My Rogers: Community Sponsored Events

Organizing your own special event fundraiser is an excellent way to help break down the stigma of mental illness and raise funds for patients and programs at Rogers Memorial Hospital. Whether it’s a golf outing, swing-a-thon, bake sale, fleece-tie blanket party or collection drive at your place of business, the Foundation will work with you to provide various levels of support and assistance as you plan and hold your fundraiser or project.

May is National Health and Wellness Month

Coping Skills Drive Informational Flyer

Coping is cool…and not just in school! The use of play and games in therapy is proven to be an effective way to help cope with intense emotions and behaviors. At Rogers, patients learn how everyday items can be used as powerful therapeutic tools to calm their minds and bodies.

Help us fill a child’s “emotional toolkit” by hosting a Coping Skills Drive at your place of work, for a civic organization’s project of the month, or individually. Donations of new, unused items or monetary gifts will help equip patients with a variety of coping skills needed to help them manage their mental health and well-being.

 

my-rogers-plan-an-event-sizedPlan Your Own Fundraising Event

Create Your Own Event Proposal Packet

Organizing your own special event fundraising and awareness event and directing the proceeds to the Rogers Memorial Hospital Foundation is a great way to show your support for mental health and wellness.

Here just a few ways former patients and families, clubs and organizations, and passionate individuals have have raised fund and friends for the Foundation:

  • Swing-a-thon – An annual event, residents at Marquette University’s Cobeen Hall swing for 36.5 hours straight to raise awareness of eating disorders and raise funds for patients at the Eating Disorder Center at Rogers Memorial Hospital.
  • Skate-a-thon – Three middle school girls set out to skate for a day to raise awareness of mental health challenges. They collected pledges to support their efforts, with all proceeds going to Rogers Memorial Hospital Foundation.
  • Rummage Sale – One passionate mother set up a rummage sale in her local high school gymnasium. She had representatives from Rogers come say a few words to bring awareness to mental health challenges and helped support the Foundation by donating all the funds from the sale in the process.
  • Golf Outing – Thanks to more than one corporation, all proceeds from their corporate golf outings supported the initiates of Rogers Foundation. A check presentation was held during the awards ceremony in which a Foundation staff member was present to talk about our mission and gratefully receive the funds.
  • …and many more!

 

my-rogers-fleece-tie-blanket-sizedSecurity Blankets

How to Make Fleece Tie Blankets

Fleece tie blankets are not only a source of comfort for our children at Rogers, but they also provide many therapeutic benefits for our 4- to 5-year olds and 5- to 6-year olds. Many of these children come to us from dangerous and scary environments. With the kinds of trauma these kids have experienced, a small, soft blanket can provide them with the grounding experience and sensory input they need to help them keep their emotions from getting out of control.

Each child keeps the blanket in their cubbie, and every morning/afternoon when they arrive, they go get their blanket and sit in their seat. They all know whose blanket belongs to whom based on the print they chose, which is often reflective of their own personality.

We find that the kids will hold the blankets throughout their entire group therapy session, and then take them wherever they go. They are especially nice to have when the children need to leave the room to take a break when things get too overwhelming for them. Even the kids who are trying to maintain a tough exterior take their blanket with them everywhere.

At the end of treatment, the children get to take the blanket with them. At home, it becomes a transitional object, reminding them of their experiences and all the things they learned while in treatment. Many patients get attached to coming to Rogers because it is a safe and stable environment for them, and anything they can take home with them that reminds them of that can be beneficial for their overall mental health and well-being.